How To Make Roman Concrete That Lasts More Than 2,000 Years… – Eco Snippets

How To Make Roman Concrete That Lasts More Than 2,000 Years…

How To Make Roman Concrete That Lasts More Than 2,000 Years...


Roman concrete was a material used in construction during the late Roman Republic until the fading of the Roman Empire. Roman concrete was based on a hydraulic-setting cement. Recently, it has been found that it materially differs in several ways from modern concrete which is based on Portland cement. Roman concrete is durable due to its incorporation of volcanic ash, which prevents cracks from spreading.

Recent scientific breakthroughs examining Roman concrete are gathering media and industry attention. Because of its unusual durability, longevity and lessened environmental footprint, corporations and municipalities are starting to explore the use of Roman-style concrete in North America, substituting the coal fly ash with volcanic ash that has similar properties.

Proponents claim that concrete made with volcanic ash can cost up to 60% less because it requires less cement, and that it has a smaller environmental footprint due to its lower cooking temperature and much longer lifespan. Usable examples of Roman concrete exposed to harsh marine environments have been found to be 2000 years old with little or no wear. Here are a couple of videos exploring how you can make it yourself…



An Attempt at Reproducing Ancient Roman Concrete by using Limestone, Volcanic Ash and Aggregate…

Using Artificial Pozzolans like Terracotta and Red Brick Dust as Substitutes for Volcanic Ash to create a Modern Version of Roman Concrete…

If you like this idea, be sure to share it with your friends and inspire someone you know. Anything becomes possible with just a little inspiration…


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(26) comments

But the America is only 280 years…..

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This is pretty cool.

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Let’s do it!

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I have been making this for years. It is called Ferro Cement, 2-1sand and cement, replace 15% of the very fine sand with a Pozzlan like Fly ash or Diatomasious earth, because i repair ferro Cement boats i add a small amount of trioxide to combat the galvanic reaction from the chicken mesh. This mix is water tight, used for water tanks and boats. amazing material..

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Whew, glad i read that, was wondering where i would get that volcano ash. Can someone recomend what location the ancient romans got their chicken wire from? ?

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Isn’t that interesting … How come that northamerican infrastructure is crumbling after only a couple of hundred years …

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Great for those that live on the big island of Hawaii

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I love it but let’s just make hempcrete.

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    Hempcrete is the future of the building industry..

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    Darn straight Perry!

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    BTW Perry love the earthen, groan roof house as well,

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    Dwayne Bauknight everyone should live in a straw bale or Hempcrete home with an green roof. Cool in summer, warm in winter, and just very cool, Sauna to the left is also S/bale.

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Could use that on our roads

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    repair the damn 2 yr old potholes on my road!

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    Concrete roads are very loud and hard (not difficult) to drive on. Also, the lifespan of modern concrete is not nearly as good as Roman concrete.

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Picking nits, but picture of aqueduct in article is made from stone, not concrete

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In NZ we call it Ferro Cement, I have been making my own for years to repair Ferro Yachts. Two to one mix of fine sharp sand and Cement, replace 15% of sand with a Pozzalan like Fly ash or silica sand. I add Trioxide to stop the galvanic reaction from wire mesh armature. Old school..

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Why 2000 year old concrete , it entails burning limestone to make .. we need products more gental on our surroundings.. I think the word is sustainable

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I recently toured Italy In our group was a geologist from Canada. He took pictures of the rocks and stones. At first I thot he was nuts so I asked him why. After listening to him, I realized these people back in the day knew more about building than we do today! They used the right mortar for the right stone and the right stone for the right job and that is why these things are standing and still being used 1000s of years later. Taking pride in the work. Respecting quality over quantity.

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Brett Quinton Bowden

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someone send this to padot

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Be nice if Ecosnippet copy the Berkeley’s Journal properly. We would have found out two main problems with Romanic cement. One takes twice as long to harden. Two there is a shortage of volcanic ash to mine which harms the environment.

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Also it mentions that Romanic cement has less psi in tensile strength. That’s why it’s used more as a mortar like in the aquaduct shown in the picture. It would never be used in concrete for slab work or solid concrete structures.

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Don’t drive on it (and salt and snowplow over it), for starters!

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