Building An Earth Bag Round House For Less Than $5,000…

Building An Earthbag Round House For Less Than $5,000...


This beautiful earth bag home contains 450 ft² of space and was built for less than $5000. Recycled or salvaged materials were used wherever it was possible (i.e. the door and flooring). The rounded shape provides great stability for the entire structure, and two rows of concrete bags reinforced with barbed wire provide a solid grounding.

Here’s a step by step of the build…

Starting on a rubble trench foundation. Railroad ballast was used for the rubble…



Building An Earthbag Round House For Less Than $5,000...

Building An Earthbag Round House For Less Than $5,000...

Covering over our sediment fabric with pea gravel…

Building An Earthbag Round House For Less Than $5,000...

Two rows of stem wall using 80 lb sacks of concrete. 2 strands of barbed wire go between every row. The thing in the middle is a building compass, made from chain link parts, used to keep the walls round and level…

Building An Earthbag Round House For Less Than $5,000...

Firewood is used to hold the barbed wire in place. The row of gravel bags going in. When tamped, they are about 2 inches thick…

Building An Earthbag Round House For Less Than $5,000...

Door frame up. The bottom layer of bags are double bags filled with gravel to keep water from wicking up into the walls…

Building An Earthbag Round House For Less Than $5,000...

A strip anchor to hold the door in place. Filling a bag with a mix of clay soil from on-site and “screenings” from a gravel quarry…

Building An Earthbag Round House For Less Than $5,000...

Building An Earthbag Round House For Less Than $5,000...

The little window near the camera will also be a cold storage in the winter. Note the first lintel over window in back. This keeps the wall stable over an “open” area such as a door or window…

Building An Earthbag Round House For Less Than $5,000...

Ropes in wall are to tie down joists when we put the roof on. Note flue through which stove pipe will exit the wall…

Building An Earthbag Round House For Less Than $5,000...

Building An Earthbag Round House For Less Than $5,000...

This is the center post that will be used to support the roof structure in the middle of the house made from locust wood…

Building An Earthbag Round House For Less Than $5,000...

Building An Earthbag Round House For Less Than $5,000...

Building An Earthbag Round House For Less Than $5,000...

Plywood going on. First roof layer is 6 mil poly. Water proof tape to join sheets. Silicone caulk was also used to help seal it. Cardboard layer (for a little extra insulation )…

Building An Earthbag Round House For Less Than $5,000...

Styrofoam (saved from dumpsters) bags sealing between joists with chicken wire for plaster over them. Hose separates earth and cement plaster. Cement wicks water up…

Building An Earthbag Round House For Less Than $5,000...

Rendering the exterior…

Building An Earthbag Round House For Less Than $5,000...

Rendering the interior…

Building An Earthbag Round House For Less Than $5,000...

The center post supporting the roof…

Building An Earthbag Round House For Less Than $5,000...

Old bottles are used in the door frames to allow for light to enter and create a stunning entrance way feature…

Building An Earthbag Round House For Less Than $5,000...

Building An Earthbag Round House For Less Than $5,000...

The completed earth bag home including solar panels on the roof…

Building An Earthbag Round House For Less Than $5,000...

If you’re looking for more information about this building technique, check out – Earthbag Building – The first comprehensive guide to all the tools, tricks, and techniques for building with bags filled with earth – or earthbags

Earthbag Building Book...

If you like this idea, be sure to share it with your friends and inspire someone you know. Anything becomes possible with just a little inspiration…



You Might Also Like...

Gardening & Self Sufficiency Lifestyle Tips!

Join over 220,000 people that get our organic gardening & self sufficiency lifestyle tips via email. Simply enter your name and best email address below and click the "Get Instant Access" Button now...

Leave a Comment:

(30) comments

Until local inspectors get involved.

Reply

    straw bale homes, cobb, and earthships are being built legally all over the U.S. and the world. Planning departments are sickeningly slow to change but they have. And if your willing to educate them, they will approve such a building if they’re unfamiliar with it. But straw bale has gotten quite big.

    Reply

Hey Brett this would be great in NT weather.

Reply

why do cement when straw bale has a smaller carbon footprint, otherwise I like.

Reply

Phu let’s go live off the grid and build one of these

Reply

Share a vid of them explaning how to do this 🙂

Reply

Looks like a fun project

Reply

Nicole Onofretchook this is for you!

Reply

Here’s your tiny house for a fraction of the cost!

Reply

Today I am selfish, I want this house 4 me.

Reply

Peter Nicholls now let’s find land

Reply

Duan Poaneki

Reply

Ellen Bajzek a nice studio

Reply

Ante Kamenjarin!!

Reply

Bill Boyer have a look at this little gem. Simple wonders of wonders

Reply

Why the hell do you keep pushing these?!

Do you know how much real sheds cost? 1/3 of that

Reply

    …but i bet the ‘real shed’ doesn’t look half so good!

    Reply

    Yep, so economic to sped $5k on a dirt house…

    Reply

    But the house you live in is so economical? I’m not saying this shed is perfect but the building codes for residential housing are a joke. There are so many building practices out there that are cheaper, faster and better for our environment, and it is ours. Everyone always wants to think there is only one way to do things…

    Reply

    There are plenty of ways to do things! Touting a $5k dirt shack is not one of them, yet this site continually offers this as a realistic option for people, when its not at all- on several levels.

    Reply

Adrian Wait x

Reply
Add Your Reply

Leave a Comment: