The Japanese Technique Of Preserving Wood With Fire… – Eco Snippets

The Japanese Technique Of Preserving Wood With Fire…

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The Japanese Technique Of Preserving Wood With Fire…

Shou Sugi Ban (or Yakisugi) is an ancient Japanese exterior siding technique that preserves wood by charring it with fire. Traditionally, Sugi wood (cryptomeria japonica L.f., also called Japanese cedar) was used. The process involves charring the wood, cooling it, cleaning it, and finishing it with a natural oil…

The Japanese Technique Of Preserving Wood With Fire…

The Japanese Technique Of Preserving Wood With Fire…

The Japanese Technique Of Preserving Wood With Fire…

The Japanese Technique Of Preserving Wood With Fire…

Today Shou Sugi Ban is an environmentally friendly way to preserve timber and (paradoxically) make it fire-resistant. Chemical preservatives, paints, and retardants are therefore unnecessary. In addition to exterior uses, the popular technique is now found in interior rooms, furniture, and artwork…

The Japanese Technique Of Preserving Wood With Fire…

The Japanese Technique Of Preserving Wood With Fire…

The Japanese Technique Of Preserving Wood With Fire…

It is still a popular tradition in the Okayama Prefecture of Japan. Nowadays, designers and architects use other species of wood like western red cedar, douglas fir, cyprus, pine and oak. The process involves charring the wood, cooling it, cleaning it, and finishing it with a natural oil. Although time consuming, the final product is not only gorgeous, with its rich, silvery finish; the charred wood also resists fire, rot, insects, and can last up to 80 years (Via OffGridQuest)…

The Japanese Technique Of Preserving Wood With Fire…

The Japanese Technique Of Preserving Wood With Fire…

The Japanese Technique Of Preserving Wood With Fire…

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(20) comments

Jerome McAllister

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Lloyd Jackson, we totally have to try this… under close spousal supervision.

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Peter Barnes, I can see you doing this!

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Sebastian Andersson kolla va fint det blir!

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I did this. It turned out pretty cool. A dark chocolate brown with the wood grain proud.

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Heat treated lumber has been a thing for a while.

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Even in France, when you sharpen a chestnut fence post, you also burn the tip slightly. Same principle.

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We use to burn fence posts too. Burn them at and. A little below ground level .

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Using the ancient Japanese tool of this fine art: the blowtorch ?

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    Better consistency than barrel burning.

    Reply

or maybe nothing preserving anymore…

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    some years ago, some European church the wood of the roof they gave treatment this way. On day X they had to call the fire brigade and whole church burned down… Nothing was preserved anymore 😉

    Reply

    Then the people did it wrong, you don’t set the wood and THEN torch it. You torch it first, then build with it.

    Reply

    oh yeah, there is no doubt they did it wrong 🙂
    neither they were Japanese 😉

    Reply

Cathryn MacCallum

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Cathryn MacCallum

Reply

Excellent for raised garden beds.

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